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Pepper Spray Treatment & Where To Buy Pepper Spray

Posted on December 16th, 2011

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Pepper Spray Treatment and Antidotes

Pepper spray is one of the most portable, affordable, discreet and efficacious non-lethal self defense weapons. Its attributes have made it a popular choice for individuals from all walks of life; its relative ease of use makes it possible for almost anyone to utilize it in threatening situations, to defend themselves when other options are insufficient.

Pepper spray should always be used for self defense – in circumstances where other forms of resistance against threat do not suffice. Many pepper spray delivery systems feature locking mechanisms – very much akin to the “safety” found on firearms – to prevent accidental discharge of the inflammatory compounds. However, under certain conditions – a panicked or confused state, a windy day that could blow the dispersed spray back toward the operator, or a simple accident, whether resulting in the operator or a nearby individual being sprayed – an unintended victim may get “hit” by the burning substance found in pepper spray, causing pain, irritation and temporary immobility.

These are, of course, the intended results of the spray; it is designed to immobilize an attacker by irritating the mucus membranes and capillaries. When pepper spray contacts the eyes – and the entry points to the respiratory system (the nose and mouth) – the eyes, by their own will, shed tears and close tightly. Vision is nigh on impossible. A violent, painful cough may be triggered; the skin on the face will burn with a powerful, inflamed sensation. Breathing may be difficult, and coordination can suffer – temporarily. Pepper spray is not designed or intended to inflict any sort of permanent damage; however, the immediate effects are extremely unpleasant. Any individual, no matter how careful, no matter how sure of themselves they are, needs to understand the available antidotes to an accidental discharge of pepper spray.

First – What Not To Do

Anyone who has had the misfortune of consuming a hotter pepper than was tolerable knows that drinking water to quell the burning sensation is, generally, of little use. The same, somewhat perplexing fact is applicable to the topical irritation caused by pepper spray. Unless a continuous application of cool water, over the entire duration of the pepper spray’s worst effects (30 minutes or longer) is made, the relief found may be temporary – and can even worsen the perceived inflammation.

When an irritating agent contacts the skin, the first reaction is to scratch or rub the area, in order to rid it of the offending substance. However – do not rub the affected area that has been pepper sprayed. Doing so may work the inflammatory compound deeper into the skin, worsening the pain, and (to add insult to injury) spreads it further, contaminating the fingertips and any delicate area they may touch.

Getting Rid Of The Burn

The short answer is that there is no quick-and-simple method of stopping the pain caused by pepper spray. Every individual has a slightly different physiological makeup and, consequently; tolerance for and reaction to the oleoresin capsicum compound found in the spray. However, a number of “standard operating procedures” do exist; whichever is most feasible under the circumstance of accidental discharge should be utilized as soon as possible.

  • The application of whole milk (which is rich is milk fat) to the inflamed area is a time-tested method for reducing the burning sensation. As is the case with the aforementioned techniques which should not be used, applying milk works both for the consumption and topical contamination of capsicum compounds. Milk can be applied in any manner that is convenient: A towel or garment can be soaked in it and applied to the skin as a sort of poultice; it can be misted onto the skin with a spray bottle repeatedly, or dribbled from a cupped hand or a bowl. If milk isn’t accessible, but another cold dairy product – such as full-fat yogurt or cream – is, it should be utilized instead. The “milk technique” is effective as a stop-gap measure, but fails to actually remove the oily, inflammatory agents found in pepper spray from the skin.

 

  • If an accidental pepper spray discharge occurs in proximity to a home or a retail outlet, the likelihood of accessing dish detergent or other liquid soaps is high. Creating a 1:3 mix of detergent and water (25 percent detergent, 75 percent water) is recommended for maximum effectiveness. Cold water should be used; when irritation occurs, cold counters it, while heat aggravates it. Since capsicum compounds have a relatively long-lived topical effect, at least 4 liters (one gallon) of this mix should be made; one should expect to apply and wash it off at least half a dozen times – or more. If the victim has fragrance or chemical sensitivities, unscented and uncolored detergent should be used to avoid introducing more irritating substances – if it is available on short notice.

 

  • If someone’s face has been sprayed, the same ratio of detergent:water should be mixed, but in a vessel suitable for immersing the face. The face should be immersed for as long as fifteen seconds, eyes tightly shut, mouth closed and breath held. Remember to breathe deeply and normally when coming up for air. The skin needs to be exposed to the detergent-water mix several times for a 10 to 15 second duration so the capsicum oils can be degraded. Do not rub the skin with the hands or anything else right away. After 4 or 5 immersions, a soft cloth, or the fingertips (either one has to be soaked/dipped in the detergent-water mix) can be used to lightly massage the mixture into the skin. It is normal to experience a temporary exacerbation of symptoms. Remain patient; they will diminish. How quickly the skin recovers from being pepper-sprayed is dependent on the individual’s physiology and skin sensitivity. When the skin feels normalized enough to touch, slightly more pressure can be used to further massage the mixture in. At this point, fresh water can be splashed on the skin between detergent-water applications. If it seems that more detergent-water mix is needed, a fresh batch, free of any residual pepper spray, can be made.

 

  • If pepper spray contaminates the eyes, and the unintended victim wears contact lenses, the lenses need to be removed as soon as possible. Keeping them in the eyes will trap the burning compounds and make cleaning the eyes difficult. Do not flush the eyes with contact lenses still in them. Attempting to remove the spray from the lenses will be a fruitless endeavor; they must be discarded and replaced. The eyes will squeeze, flutter and shed tears; these are natural responses to any irritant and will help remove the spray. To expedite the process, the eyes can be rinsed with a solution of saline.

 

  • Medics sometimes treat pepper spray contamination with a combination of liquid antacid and water, using aluminum hydroxide or magnesium hydroxide based antacids, such as Maalox. First, water is used to rinse the eyes, followed by several drops of the liquid antacid-water mixture. However, this treatment is not recommended for the inexperienced.

 

  • When the eyes are being flushed, whether with saline – or, if unavailable, plain water or water mixed with salt – the victim should sit or kneel. Leaning forward will cause less water or other solution to splash the clothes they are wearing, and help prevent contaminating their clothes with pepper spray. Their head should be tilted to the side of the eye that is being flushed. The eye should be opened by pinching slightly below the center of the eyebrow, and flushed from the inner corner of the eye to the outside, quickly, avoiding the tear-duct. The solution should not make its way into the other eye.
  • When dealing with a substance such as pepper spray, which has the potential (however small) of causing unintended pain, preemptive measures should always be taken. Those who choose to carry pepper spray may also consider carrying a product called Sudecon Wipes. These small, individually packaged decontamination wipes contain a rapidly acting solution that neutralizes the agents found in pepper spray (and tear gas). They are able to reduce the sensation of burning is as little as seven minutes.

 

The above methods of removing pepper spray from the skin and eyes are effective, and (with the exception of the liquid antacid-water formulation) are accessible to most individuals. It is important for anyone that has been accidentally pepper-sprayed to remember that even when the correct procedures to remove contamination are followed, residual irritation can subsist for a few hours after the incident. Patience, calmness and avoiding inflaming the area more – by rubbing or scratching – are important. The uncomfortable sensations will subside.

A Note On Anaphylactic Reactions

Pepper spray is “non-lethal”. Under almost any circumstance, it causes temporary, albeit extremely uncomfortable effects – not death. No lethal dose is noted on the MSDS for the oleoresin capsicum compound. However, several incidents in which pepper spray caused death have been documented. The deaths were the result of a fatal reaction to the spray, referred to as anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis manifests as shock, loss of consciousness and airway obstruction. (In highly allergic individuals, other substances, such as those found in bee-stings, shellfish and peanuts can cause the same reaction.) Asthma is a risk factor for an adverse (fatal) reaction to pepper spray. Although anaphylactic shock can be treated with the correct medicines, if utilized in a timely manner, and by a qualified individual, this rare but serious side effect must serve as a burden and strong reminder of responsibility to anyone considering carrying pepper spray. This powerful spray is not a toy. It must be respected and only be used when absolutely necessary. Occasionally, accidents happen – and if pepper spray is unintentionally discharged, this article may be referenced to find commonplace antidotes.

Where to buy pepper spray?

Look no further than the place your are at. Personal Savers pepper spray is the leader in unique designs for running, jogging, biking or hiking. CLICK HERE to

Original article wrote by: www.buy-pepper-spray-today.com

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Great Bicycle Safety Tips – A Must Read

Posted on December 9th, 2011

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Cycle Saver - Pepper Spray For BicyclingRecently we posted some very useful safety tips for running, walking and jogging.  Below are some GREAT bicycle safety tips.  On top of these tips, make sure to pick up your Cycle Saver pepper spray for added protection from all those unforeseen situations when you’re out on the road or trail.  Be safe and fun out on your next bike ride.

That means bicyclists must obey the rules of the road like drivers of any other vehicle and must be treated as equal users by all other vehicles.

The best way to avoid collisions is to be prepared and be aware of other vehicles around you. Avoid common bicyclist errors and common motorist errors committed around bicyclists.

Here are some safety tips for biking:

  1. Obey traffic signs and signals – Bicycles must follow the rules of the road like other vehicles.
  2. Never ride against traffic – Motorists aren’t looking for bicyclists riding on the wrong side of the road. State law and common sense require that bicyclists drive like other vehicles.
  3. Follow lane markings – Don’t turn left from the right lane. Don’t go straight in a lane marked “right-turn only.”
  4. Don’t pass on the right – Motorists may not look for or see a bicycle passing on the right.
  5. Scan the road behind you – Learn to look back over your shoulder without losing your balance or swerving. Some riders use rear-view mirrors.
  6. Keep both hands ready to brake – You may not stop in time if you brake one-handed. Allow extra distance for stopping in the rain, since breaks are less efficient when wet.
  7. Wear a helmet and never ride with headphones – Always wear a helmet. Never wear a headphone while riding a bike.
  8. Dress for the weather – In rain wear a poncho or waterproof suit. Dress in layers so you can adjust to temperature changes. Wear bright colored clothing.
  9. Use hand signals – Hand signals tell motorists and pedestrians what you intend to do. Signal as a matter of law, of courtesy, and of self-protection.
  10. Ride in the middle of the lane in slower traffic – Get in the middle of the lane at busy intersections and whenever you are moving at the same speed as traffic.
  11. Choose the best way to turn left – There are two choices: (1) Like an auto: signal to move into the left turn lane and then turn left. (2) Like a pedestrian: ride straight to the far side crosswalk. Walk your bike across.
  12. Make eye contact with drivers – Assume that other drivers don’t see you until you are sure that they do. Eye contact is important with any driver which might pose a threat to your safety.
  13. Look out for road hazards – Watch out for parallel-slat sewer grates, gravel, ice, sand or debris. Cross railroad tracks at right angles.
  14. Use lights at night – The law requires a white headlight (visible from at least 500 feet ahead) and a rear reflector or taillight (visible up to 300 feet from behind).
  15. Keep your bike in good repair – Adjust your bike to fit you and keep it working properly. Check brakes and tires regularly. Routine maintenance is simple and you can learn to do it yourself.

 

More Safety Information

 

CLICK HERE to purchase a CYCLE SAVER Now!

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Sunday morning moutain bike ride

Posted on November 27th, 2011

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Cycle Saver pepper spray for biking

Chad's bike (owner of Personal Savers)

We just returned from our Personal Savers Sunday morning moutian bike ride.  No wild animal attacks but riding with the Cycle Saver pepper spray unit, we are safe as can be out on the trails.

Make sure to pick up a Cycle Saver at our online store for your Fall/Winter mountain bike rides.  Personal Savers will have your back on your next cycling adventure.

 

Happy Thanksgiving…Be Safe With Personal Savers Pepper Spray

Posted on November 24th, 2011

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Personal Savers would like to wish everyone a Happy Thanksgiving.  Keep safe out there while running, jogging, biking or walking with a Personal Savers pepper spray product.  Just don’t spray your family members over the turkey.

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The All New Social Corner

Posted on November 17th, 2011

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We just launched a new section on the Personal Savers site called the Social Corner.  We look forward to connecting with everyone and keeping everyone informed on what’s happening a Personal Savers.  It’s great way to keep up to date on all our new pepper spray and safety products for running, jogging, walking, hiking, biking or skating.

Pepper Spray Sale

Pepper Spray Sale

Reviews


Women's Running Magazine

Personal Savers are revolutionizing the way active women can protect themselves...
Read full review by CLICKING HERE


Bonnie Dewkett - The Joyful Organizer

I wore this for running and while I was worried it was going to be bulky and uncomfortable, I really forgot I had it on...
Read full review by CLICKING HERE


Jenny Hadfield - Runners World, Active.com

A product even McGyver would be proud of, Personal Savers are revolutionizing the way you protect yourself while enjoying your favorite activities...
Read full review by CLICKING HERE

About Personal Savers


The idea for Personal Savers was born in 1995 by Derek Downing and Chad Smith, two national and world champion professional inline speed skaters. While training on the open roads in Georgia, they always came across unruly drivers and stray dogs nipping at their feet. Derek's father David Downing owned an in house pepper spray business that sold to police forces worldwide which helped spark the idea of the original Wrist Saver.

The original Wrist Saver was a crude version of itself today but the concept to keep people safe while being active was born. That idea grew into an actual company, but with the strains of traveling for competitions the business was put on hold...
Read our full story by CLICKING HERE

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Street Address: 11230 Bramshill Drive
City: Alpharetta
State: Georgia
Zip Code: 30022

Phone: 678-648-7156

Email: info@personalsavers.com
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